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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,861 (some duplicates have been removed)
chief data officer. thank you so much for being here. (applause) >> good morning, everyone. i'm kate howard. i'm the mayor's budget director. i'm here to just to talk briefly about the really exciting opportunity that i think is going to be coming up in the city, which is announcement of our new chief data officer. some people may think that the budget office is mostly being countered, but really our office is focused on how do we make government more efficient, how do we make it more effective, and how do we use information to make better decisions. and i think that's why the mayor has asked that the chief data officer sit in my office. so that they have access to financial information as well as a team of people who are already inclined to work on analytical problems. so, as the mayor and board president chiu indicated we'll be hiring a chief data officer looking for the best and brightest people. so, if you know of people or if you yourself are interested, i'd love to talk to you, so, find me after. the role of this person is to figure out how do we build on what we've already don
the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, i
of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excit
that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the grea
&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then
access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room
scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the off
are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because the
neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help public service, like the fire department, the police department, the mta know more about how people move around. so, we're providing crowd data. so, if a thousand people pass one of our sensors in an hour, that data will be
the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work
be a list of every park in san francisco. i would find it in wikipedia. we stumbled into the sf data website and started looking. it was unbelievable, actually. so, some of the data sets we really needed were already there in very, very good format. and random things that i would never think of like movie set locations in the city of san francisco or every piece of civic art that was there, just really interesting things all with, you know, latitude-longitude, tags and information about them. it was really interesting. and then in my first meeting, in our first meeting with the innovation group, the city i heard of 10 other things that i clearly should have been using and didn't even know existed, literally within the first 15 minutes of the meeting. ss things like street safety, sidewalk safety scores and quality scores so we could wrap people around places. * route people around places. really unbelievable. we availed ourselves of resources going forward. we had the same -- like any data set, you find great things about it. then there's missing values or is thisxtion that got auto populat
. >> this is the 18th edition. it's been around for awhile. you've seen it often. and that data is through the calendar year 2011. as you know, it covers a range of demographic and economic items from populations from employment to monetary transactions and building activity. there are two sets of goals. a short term goal to more vied land use and economic data and make that available to community groups, businesses and private public agencies. and then there is a long-term goal which is to establish a consistent time series of data which can actually be used for research and analysis, compile some background information and use that for updating the commerce and industry element of the general plan. this year we have a new format. the first section is an about section which basically describes this new format and provides a little basic information on the data and method that will be useful for the summary sections. and then there is an information graphic highlight, which you can see a clip of under building permit there in the lower right corner. provide key findings and simple graphics
components. a quick look at the data or detailed look of the data indicates that san francisco's economic recovery continued in 2011. jobs were up 2%. they're at 5 69,000 jobs at the end of 2011. unemployment was down to 8.6% from 9.5%. total wages earned city-wide were up 8% to 45 billion. this construction spending or cost estimate number was at 3.4 billion, which is up 52% over the year previously. taxable sales was up. city revenue was up a little. and city expenditures were flat from the previous year, which is a good thing and they're less than revenues. in terms of a sneak peek of 2012, looks like recovery is continuing. we've got a nonseasonally adjusted unemployment rate as of september 2012, it's down to 6.9% from annual average in 2011 of 8.6%. and we've got a gain of almost 10,000 jobs, up 2%, since the beginning of the year. this is employment development department data, their monthly labor force report release. and on that note, i conclude my briefing and entertain any questions or comments you might have. >> commissioner wu. >> i just wanted to ask on the point that you ma
of the lower paying jobs will be the fact that you may be getting the data from one of these jobs, not the multiple jobs that are -- because of the nature of the work it lends itself to having different employers. another thing i came up with here was the transportation piece. and i saw a huge number rider ship on the san bruno lines and historically the geary line was always the heaviest and the judah line for the light rail which remained real heavy, but i'm sort of surprised why the san bruno lines were as heavy as they are and that might be something we really want to look at for the future to see if there's anyway -- i know we'll have the central subway, but that won't necessarily deal with that particular section of the city. most typically that's southeastern san francisco. the only thing i know of that would be close to there might be the caltrain where there's a station at potrero hill and there used to be one at paul. i don't know it's operational any more. there's the bayview station just at the san francisco, san mateo county line. but certainly bears paying attention
reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at e data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people will be creative in having thisçe challenge to be something positive for the city. i wanted to announce that, get that out there with you, and join this wonderful challenge that you have, and think about how we could work together. meanwhile, in between that stuff and in between celebrating the month and doing things we have to write a proposal to win the superbowl in san francisco. thank you very much. thank you. >> [applause.] >> thank you, mayor lee. >> all right. we're on. apologies for the difficulties and i want to welcome everyone to the special meeting of the government audit and oversight committee today on monday october 29 here in the city and county of san francisco home of the world series champions giants. i
lives in the city, to give your data of your own energy use in the city, like your home energy use? all that data about when you use it, what are your hot times, your cool times. how about if we try to find some way to inspire people to give us that]h data, in some coordinated way. because if we understand that 20 to 22% of our emissions comes from1ar residenl use, you can imagine if we had that data coming from every household use in the city we could break that data down with involvement of creative people like yourselves, and then try o see where there's patterns where we could lessen our carbon footprint and talk about better energy use. that's perfect for us. that's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully, some time after this challenge is announced, and if we can get the best ideas out there, we will be engaged with you to select the best answer. and if there's an idea out there that can answer that question about how to inspire people, then hopefully wq can
are things like we are going to unlock the data of government by the fall. taking the rich stores of data that we have in the government and making it open and making it readable, and building application and programming around it in a way that the people can... on the outside. and there are now companies being founded and formed, truly gone public today in the public a few months ago, a couple of companies that are largely based on government data, you know, examples all over the place. if you look at the era in which the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the
system when is we ought to have a one and dozens of data centers when we ought to have one and when we have a streamlined and smaller agreement scpis could go on and on as you know. we identified these problems over the decade and somewhat can't solve them as the civil grand jury report pointed out we have a budget that is pushing $250 million i continue to be told by city staff and vendors that we could save tens of millions of dollars and be more efficient if we manage our information technology. now i do hope that today's session is an opportunity to talk about good and creative ideas. one of the phenomena i have seen is frankly a lot of finger pointing at different departments and who is at fault, and i think it's important to think why we got to this place, but what is the road map that is going to change thins? i know there are some that hope if and when we hire a new cio will change things and i want to note we had four individuals in those positions in the last ten years and not much as changed. the structure of how we govern ourselves from a it standpoint has not changed
to evaluate them on an ongoing basis? for that focused data is needed. it's not done now. either is a data base for personnel city wide and match needs with talent and ability. we don't do that because we don't look at technology as important city wide service. we propose the introduction of city wide annual report to the mayor and the board of supervisors. at the last meeting the mayor's representative endorsed an idea like this. we applaud that. it needs to happen. we proposed a consolidated city wide budget and staffing plans, and if my slides work correctly, you can read that what your administrative code requires. it's not necessarily what is presented. without comprehensive information there is no way to evaluate the success of ict city wide consolidations. we found no real analysis to point where cost savings come from department to department for the city for any of the consolidations. isn't there is a need -- didn't i just do this? we propose a consolidated city wide ict budget and staffing plans. we propose a survey of ict performance from departments that is updated period
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,861 (some duplicates have been removed)